Here you can read reviews of some of the Streetsoul releases.

Nik Weston.Juno Records January 2012

Hardsoul Featuring Ron Carroll - Back Together -Streetsoul 45

Started in 2007 and run by Andy Davies Streetsoul is one of the UK's specialist labels focusing in putting out releases warmly welcomed by the specilist soul fraternity. Here the label get Chris Bangs (the legendary & inspirational figure in the British underground black dance scene since the 1980's)to make two special 45 edits taken from the US Soulfuric label soulful house anthem from dutch producers Hardsoul featuring legendary US vocalist Ron Carroll.It's a smooth and well produced affair with distinct chords,live bass and repetive handclaps with Ron's soaring vocals driving the catchy melody home in fine fashion.




Simon White Manifesto Magazine September 2010

JERLINE AND FRIENDS - JOY TRIP PART 1/ GET IT OFF OF MY CONSCIENCE - STREETSOUL SSR6 7"
Fast becoming a collectors label of choice, these two tracks are taken from Streetsouls first every release, the album Jerlene And Friends. In case you missed it at the time, the album was unreleased for years, existing only as an acetate discovered a few years ago by Andy Davies. So here are two of the key tracks from the album on 45, a slinky 'rare groove' number which sounds like a Gene Page/Barry White production voiced by a young (Little) Esther Phillips, and a version of Get It Off My Conscience a track popular for some years on Northern Soul dancefloors by The Lovelites. Jerlene wrote Conscience and I'm pretty sure this version is the same rhythm track but made more stompy (is that a word?) with extra strings, guitars and a stronger vocal. I'm totally biased but for me this is the best yet 45 from the label in a line of great 7" releases. Joy Trip is a popular record in France and the first run sold out very quickly so I suggest you grab one of these pdq.
While we're on this 45 lets try and clear something up. This is NOT a reissue it is, like the Expansion Special Reserve series a FIRST issue on 7", not a reissue. Some dealers don't seem to understand the difference and list them as reissues which is a bit surprising because 1, surely they should know their product, and 2, by emphasising the 'first issue' status, surely their are letting their customers know that what they are being offered is a legitimate, first time on seven inch record and not a reissue of an existing 45 which as wee all know in the strange world of Northern/Rare Soul is given high importance..... and if it isn't important, why bother to tag it as a reissue in the first place??


From Colin Dilnot's "In Dangerous Rhythm" Website:

An old mate Andy Davies has just released a cracking CD on his new label Streetsoul by Jerline and Friends. If you like mid-70s sophisticated Chicago soul then you will have to have this CD! This album is up there with the likes of Imaginations on 20th Century, Heaven & Earth's GEC album, Brighter Side Of Darkness, Lovelites, South Side Movement 20th Century album etc.

From Dusty Groove America:

A sweet batch of obscure late 70s soul from Jerline & Friends -- a real lost treasure from the Chicago scene -- seeing light of day for the first time ever! Jerline Shelton's vocals are sublimely commanding on this style straddling set of tunes -- from uptempo two step, to electric funky bits, to a more intimate soul mode! Each tune on Best Of Friends is handled masterfully, whether it soars with the strings and uplifting elements of the disco era, pops with electric keys and synthy funk, and some more emotive moments in a Curtis Mayfield vibe -- but all in a way that's much more cohesive and deeply soulful than the single that was issued back in the 70s by Jerline. The album shares the creative core members -- and one common track -- featured on the funky soul classic LP Hot Spot by Royal Flush! Produced by Chicago radio legend Lucky Cordell. Titles include "Joy Trip (Parts 1)", "Best Of Friends", "Goddess Of Love", "Lend A Helping Hand", "Joy Trip (Part 2)", "Tell Me", "Personality", "Open Up Your Heart", "What Tomorrow's Bringing" and "Get It Off My Conscience".

From Basic Soul's Andy Allen:

Soul DJ Andy Davies kick starts his new Streetsoul label in fine style with this Chicago rarity which he discovered on acetate whilst working at John Anderson’s Soul Bowl record shop during the mid 90s. After airing ‘Joy Trip (Part 1)’ on his radio show the track caused a huge buzz amongst the soul fraternity and has eventually resulted in this release. ‘Joy Trip (Part 1)’ is a majestic string fueled two stepper of the highest order but the album packed full of quality tunes covering northern, crossover and funk styles plus a great version of The Lovelites’ ‘Get It Off My Conscience’.

Andy Allen, 05/07

From Simon White Blues & Soul:

This is fascinating stuff for soul fans and highlights both the wealth of soul talent that America continued to produce throughout the 1970s and peculiarities of the UK's obsession with obscure soul music from the last 40 years.
DJ Andy Davies’ liner notes tell how he found this unreleased ‘70s album as an acetate while working at the 'Soul Bowl' record shop. Plays at gigs and on internet radio (which surely are the true carriers of the underground soul torch now) created a demand, especially for the lead track 'Joy Trip' (part 1) and it's worth having for this brilliant piece of two-step alone.
This album is a mixture of styles: 'Best Of Friends' is a great Ecstasy, Passion and Pain-styled mid-‘70s dancer while 'Open Up Your Heart' is one of those skippy, summery tracks which had a throwback sound even in the ‘70s. 'What Tomorrow Brings' is a funky mid-‘70s dancer and the last track is a killer for version freaks: a take on The Lovelites’ 'Get It Off Of My Conscience' written by Jerline Shelton and which sounds like the same backing track beefed up and then re-vocalised by Jerline herself.
All told, this is an essential issue of an impossible-to-find album that almost certainly never saw the light of day at the time and but for the efforts and dedication of Britain's soul underground, never would.
Words Simon White

From Bill Buckley Blues & Soul:

To hear them talking you wouldn’t know it, but UK soul lovers are fantastically lucky. They’re served by a whole host of small indie labels that constantly feed their hunger for the rare, the deep, the esoteric, and the authentically soulful groove. The enthusiasts who run these labels regularly scour the States to uncover tunes they know will satisfy and often their only reward is just getting the music out there.

One such enthusiast is UK soul DJ, Andy Davies, who’s just launched his own label - Street Soul. Andy’s soul pedigree goes way back but in the mid 90s he found himself working for Soul Bowl. There he came across acetate of Chicago soul credited to Jerline and Friends. Nifty detective work discovered that Jerline was Chicago vocalist Jerline Shelton, who in the 70s led a group called Royal Flush. They’d scored locally with ‘Hot Spot’ but for all kinds of reasons the Hot Spotters morphed into her ‘Friends’. Working with writer Maurice ‘Matavani’ Commander, Jerline and her ‘mates’ recorded a batch of tracks which ended up on that old acetate.

Davies began playing one of the cuts ‘Joy Trip (part 1)’ on his Solar and Starpoint radio shows and he had lots of positive feedback – good vibes that continued when the tune was aired at his live gigs. Andy, therefore, decided to secure rights to the music and after the usual legal wrangles, we have ‘Best Of Friends’, a thoroughly satisfying and varied modern soul 10 tracker on his brand new Street Soul label. And it has turned into a sweet batch of obscure late 70s soul from Jerline & Friends seeing light of day for the first time ever!

Jerline Shelton's vocals are sublimely commanding on this style straddling set of tunes -- from uptempo two step, to electric funky bits, to a more intimate soul mode! Each tune on Best Of Friends is handled masterfully, whether it soars with the strings and uplifting elements of the disco era, pops with electric keys and synthy funk, and some more emotive moments in a Curtis Mayfield vibe -- but all in a way that's much more cohesive and deeply soulful than the single that was issued back in the 70s by Jerline. The album shares the creative core members -- and one common track -- featured on the funky soul classic LP Hot Spot by Royal Flush! Produced by Chicago radio legend Lucky Cordell. Titles include "Joy Trip (Parts 1)", "Best Of Friends", "Goddess Of Love", "Lend A Helping Hand", "Joy Trip (Part 2)", "Tell Me", "Personality", "Open Up Your Heart", "What Tomorrow's Bringing" and "Get It Off My Conscience".

Andy’s clear in his mission – “As a soul fan, I always need to hear new music, whether it is a brand new find or something that has been hidden away for 30 years or more… the time’s right to share this music with soul fans right across the world.”

Patrick Henry review from the Soulchoonz Website:


From the excellent Street Soul Records comes another release to follow-up from the Jerline & Friends CD. The new release is a do-not 7" single taken from the Patrick Henry & The Liberation Band's 1995 album "Come And Get It", and was originally released on CD on Lanor Records in the USA. Street Soul Records have licensed 2 tracks for this particular 7” release namely the A side "Loving U" and the B side "My Love". These, if you are not familiar with the CD, are both excellent. I'm not at all surprised that these tracks have been played heavily on the UK Soul Scene of late, and the label says that the demand for a 45 was inevitable. Not sure about that as I'd rather have the CD than a 45 any day! However, collectors and nostalgics do love these curious things! LOL. The single was released on June 20th 2008 and is very limited to only 500 copies! The songs, as I have already stated, are excellent.
"Loving U" is a song that could have been recorded in the mid 70s. The instrumentation is all real, live and crammed with soulfulness. The live drumming and summery guitar hark back to the days of A Taste Of Honey's “I Love You” and even Steve Parks' “Movin' In The Right Direction”. The horns sound almighty fine too, and the melody is straight into the classic soul bag. I class this a fine soul music for a summer's day. The flip-side is "My Love" is equally temperate and contains a bassline-driven groove and allows the horns to punch in all the right places. Both songs have a hint of Carlton J. Smith to them, and I could easily see Carlton attempt these grooves and vice versa! The feel is definitely – dare IO say this – old school in approach and nothing within these grooves give an indication of being released in 1995! Like MOST quality soul of the 90s, this was ignored for whatever street / urban / rap flibbertigibbet was in vogue in London at the time, so it is not 'til now that the songs are getting the airing they deserve. Why does the soul world (or so it proclaims) ignore what is happening right now, quality-wise, and only support it when someone deems it rare or hip? Its beyond me, it really is!




Barry Towler,
The Vibe Scribe